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Sugar Dish Me

"if you can read, you can cook" -my momma

Take One Down, Pass It Around

with 4 comments

Christmas is over and this house is full of fever.  

Cabin fever.

The kids are still home from school, and though they have a host of new toys, games, and water guns (thanks, Aunt Lindsey), they really seem to most enjoy harassing each other. And me.

Yesterday when Andrew’s belligerent little butt got sent to his room he proceeded to belt the national anthem while perched on the edge of his bed. Then he argued with Evan about a book that he only wanted to hold– NOT READ– and only because Evan picked it up. This is all after he shot Evan with the water gun. In the house.

Come on, guys. Seriously?

I am praying for snow – a fantastic way to get your children out of the house on Christmas break. Throwing snowballs is totally wholesome, right? But with the good ‘ol southern temperature in the 60’s every day of December, I’m afraid that this week I may just be out of luck… stupid North Carolina anti-Christmas weather.

My solution? I spiked the chili.

Okay, really, as I explained to Andrew, the alcohol cooks out and you’re just left with the flavor. You know, like the vanilla you put in your cookies? Though I was informed by my brother over Christmas that once our dad freaked out because Michael added a dash of vanilla to his hot chocolate when he was about 10. Settle down, everyone. Use the good vanilla (yes you CAN tell the difference!!!). Your kids will not get drunk off chocolate chip cookies. Or a bottle of beer in your chili.

But I did enjoy a cold one while this cooked. It helps with the fever, you know?

Brown stew meat cut into bite size pieces in just a little bit of vegetable oil, and then remove from the skillet and set aside.

Then cook two diced onions (I know it sounds like A LOT of onion… just bear with me here) and 3 or 4 cloves of chopped garlic in the drippings left in the pan until they’re soft.

To the onions and garlic, add ½ cup chopped green pepper, 2 cans of diced tomatoes with green chiles (I used Ro-tel) and 1 can of diced tomates. Continue cooking over medium high heat for another minute or two, and then add the beef back in, along with oregano, cumin, salt, pepper, and worcestershire sauce.

Stir in a cup of chicken broth and a bottle of beer. I used Yuengling Black and Tan. Dark beer tastes extra great with the beef, but I have made this with a can of Bud Light cause it’s what was in the fridge. It was good both ways.

Bring everything to a boil, and then reduce the heat to low-ish and simmer, partially covered, for 2 hours. Then drain and rinse a can of black beans and stir them into the pot for the last 30 minutes of cooking.

You can add a little more broth while cooking  if you feel like the chili has gotten too thick. The beef will be tender and the tomatoes with green chiles lend a spicy flavorful hand. Serve with diced green peppers on top and a dollop of sour cream. Crackers are a must.

Beef & Beer Chili

Ingredients

2 tablespoons oil

2 1/2 pounds stew meat cut into bite-sized pieces

2 onions, chopped

3-4 cloves garlic, finely chopped

2 small cans of diced tomatoes with green chiles (such as Ro-tel… that variety can be found in 10 ounce cans)

1 (14.5 ounce) can of diced tomatoes

1/2 cup diced green pepper

2 teaspoons dried oregano

1 1/2 teaspoons cumin

2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce

salt and black pepper to taste

1 cup chicken broth

12 ounce bottle (or can) of beer

1 (15 ounce) can of black beans, drained and rinsed

To Make

Heat the oil in a large deep non-stick skillet or dutch oven. Brown the beef over medium heat and then remove from the pan and set aside. Cook the onions and garlic until tender in the drippings left in the pan (about 4 or 5 minutes). Add the diced tomatoes with green chiles, diced tomatoes, and green peppers. Continue cooking until the tomatoes are simmering. Then add the beef back in, along with the oregano, cumin, salt, pepper, and worcestershire sauce. Pour in the chicken broth and the beer and bring the pot to a boil. Partially cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer for two hours and then add the black beans for the last 30 minutes of cooking.

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Written by Heather @ Sugar Dish Me

December 29, 2011 at 10:47 am

Posted in Dinner

Tagged with , , ,

4 Responses

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  1. Beer in chili=good. I had to come and give your post some love. I like the use of stew meat. We use steak in ours sometimes, when we have leftovers.

    creativenoshing

    February 9, 2012 at 5:45 pm

    • Thank you! I used to make this pretty often and then beef got to be like $8,000 a pound, so i’s been awhile. It’s definitely one of my favories, though– and easy cause I usually have most of these ingredients in the cabinet. And the beer flavor hangs tough with this recipe; it doesn’t cook all the way out like it does with some.

      Heather @ SugarDish(Me)

      February 9, 2012 at 7:11 pm

  2. […] Today let’s do a scene and pretend I could modify my favorite beef and beer chili recipe to accomodate the chicken and jalapeno peppers loafing around in my fridge. If you’re feeling beefy, see the original Beef and Beer Chili post here. […]

  3. […] Typically my children provide me with an endless resource of things to write about. Evan goes to school wearing mismatched shoes or tells me a story about squirrels. Andrew tries to explain the trials and tribulations of Minecraft or completely confounds me with his math homework (math is NOT my department). My two boys are inspiration plain and simple, even when I’m just writing about their latest ridiculous arguement. […]


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